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September 08, 2009

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I've actually had friends refer me to Onion articles as if they were real. Yeesh.

I've got some other "real" science places that they could look too

Discovery Institute
Institute for Creation Research
North American Society of Homeopaths (NASH)
American College of Acupuncture
Heartland Institute
.
.
.

they are just as much of a joke..

Have you got hiccups, Techskeptic, or have you just changed your handle?)

I'm an old hand on sites like ApolloHoax.net and Clavius.org, as I imagine you may be, Tech. If so, you know only too well the Mohorovicic depths to which people's IQs can plummet when they hear the two nouns "Moon" and "Landing" in close proximity.

It seems this affliction may no longer be restricted to wealthy Western countries.

The Onion strikes again, and, hooks another sucker. Trouble is, their articles are generally so damn good. I love 'em.

I have no idea why my handle is stuttering now. It happened when I started signing in with my google account. At least it remembers me now. :/

Where the hell did you pick up a term like Mohorovicic? I had to go look that one up.

Haha, unfortunately it's not the first time The Onion is taken seriously.

Makes you wonder when you read about the Chinese newspaper who republished the story about congress threatening to move to another city if they weren't given a new building with a retractable roof. According to the wikipedia page the "Evening News initially stood by the story, demanding proof of its falsehood"...... Fail-O-lympics.

Where the hell did you pick up a term like Mohorovicic?

I read a book called "The Mohole Mystery" by Hugh Walters when I was a teeny-tiny proto-skeptic. Mr Walters wrote a series of novels about astronaut Chris Godfrey and his spacefaring chums Tony Hale, Morrey Kant and Serge Smyslov.

Most of the Chris Godfrey novels involved travelling to other solar planets, and the main premise was to maximise the real scientific content and keep the "magic technological wand" bit to a minimum.

"The Mohole Mystery" was a rare departure set on Planet Earth, and that taught me the marvellous term Mohorovicic Discontinuity.

Hey, never mind about Armstrong and the moon hoaxers - the real point of this story is that there's someone out there named "Hasanuzzuman!" And it's Hasanuzzuman Khan no less! My coolness meter just peaked into the red, no matter how gullible the guy is! Sorry, back on topic -

Hi ... love the blog...

Diff.Thinkr

Think Anew

You could add The Hindu to the list too. They L-o-V-e homeopathy and reprint any and all garbled nonsense their local snake charmers ask them to.

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